watch television shows

A.C. Sherrill


A.C. Sherrill, Sr. was born in Lincoln County, and his grandfather, John Nelson Gardner, was from Waynesville, North Carolina. His grandfather was born in Waynesville in 1876, and the cattle business brought him to Lincoln County at the beginning of the twentieth century. Sherrill’s grandfather met his wife, Mattie Tait, in Rankintown, Gaston County, North Carolina, while herding cattle there.

Rankintown was located between Mount Holly and Stanley. Sherrill and his family have been an integral part of Tucker’s Grove Camp meeting for over one hundred years.

Media

Click here to view the Lincoln County Voices Photo Gallery

Downloadables

The audio recording and printable transcript of the interview are available below:

Click here to download the audio file.
(QuickTime 2.7MB)

Click here to download a printable version of the complete transcript.
(PDF 64kb)


What follows is the transcript of A.C. Sherrill’s interview:

A.C. Sherrill, Sr.

Interviewee: A.C. Sherrill, Sr.

Interviewers: Robert Hamilton

Format: Audio Cassette (6 Minutes, 4 seconds)

Transcriber: Jason L. Harpe

Coverage: Lincoln County, North Carolina, early 1900s -2005

Subjects: Sherrill Family, Tucker’s Grover Campground, “Stonewall” Jackson, John Nelson Gardner, Waynesville, N.C., cattle herding.

Transcript Begins

A.C. Sherrill, Sr.

Interviewee: A.C. Sherrill, Sr.

Interviewers: Robert Hamilton

Format: Audio Cassette (6 Minutes, 4 seconds)

Transcriber: Jason L. Harpe Coverage: Lincoln County, North Carolina, early 1900s -2005

Subjects: Sherrill Family, Tucker’s Grover Campground, “Stonewall” Jackson, John Nelson Gardner, Waynesville, N.C., cattle herding.

Transcript Begins

AS (A.C. Sherrill): Alright, papa.

RH (Robert Hamilton): His name?

AS: John Nelson Gardner. And, actually, papa, he was born in Waynesville County up in the mountains. That is where he came from, Waynesville, North Carolina. He used to tell us how he got down here. And, he used to tell me said, “You know how I got down here?”, and I said no papa how? He said that they used to have a cattle, you know, a place where they used to slaughter the cattle. And, said that they used to herd cattle all the way down here.

RH: What year what that wonder?

AS: Oh me, before he met Grandma Mattie.

RH: So roughly what year you think that would been? Late 1800s?

AS: Yeah, 18 — papa was born in 1876.

RH: 1876?

AS: Around there.

RH: And they were herding cattle?

AS: Yeah, from Waynesville all the way to Charlotte. And, he was telling me how he met Grandmaw. And, he said that they herded cattle down here and when they got the cattle down here he didn’t go back. He found a job on a Rankin farm. Rankin farm is down in Mount Holly, from Stanley to Mount Holly was known as Rankintown. So, that is where he met Grandmaw. And, met grandmaw Mattie Tait and they got married, and out of that reunion came fourteen children.

RH: Fourteen children?

AS: Um, hm. And momma is the only one living now.

RH: Is that right? So that was your mother’s dad? And, he was part Cherokee.

AS: Yes, um hm. And, they came out of the mountains, and it was him and he had two other brothers, and he had a sister. And, you could really see it in them. Yeah, papa used to sit around and tell me history all of the time.

RH: Now your mother said that there are seven of y’all in the family.

AS: Yeah. Yes, seven and five of us are living now. I am the baby. And, but Lincoln County is full of history.

RH: Yeah.

AS: Stonewell Jackson. You know his place is down the road there. My daughter, all of us stay on some of his property.

RH: Did you grow up in Gaston or Lincoln County?

AS: I grew up in Gaston, but since I got married I been in Lincoln County. Property I acquired they still got signs up “Stonewall Jackson” how he married. The, you know, what is her name? They got signs up. You know, this is a historical place.

RH: Oh, absolutely. How long have you been coming to camp meeting?

AS: Oh, since I was about six or seven.

RH: Your mother always brought you?

AS: My father brang me. So I’m 60 now, so you’re talking about 54 years. Long time.

RH: Long time.

RH: Your name?

AS: I’m A.C. Sherrill, Sr.

RH: A.C. Sherrill, Sr.

END OF TRANSCRIPT